2000s Beauty

It’s the last post of the Decades of Beauty series! It’s cool that it only took me five years to finish it, right? That’s not that long in the scheme of things. I mean, I covered nine decades in five years. That’s actually quite impressive.

This post will cover beauty trends up through 2010. That decade is called the “aughts”, which is a weird word. It sounds like something a person trying to be cool would say. Like “Bro, you remember that time in the aughts?” I personally prefer “the early 2000s” or “the previous decade.”

Anything after 2010 is part of the decade we are in, so I can’t write about that for another three years. Maybe I’ll be on schedule for that post. Maybe.

Although I lived through it and started my career as a makeup artist during the previous decade, it is difficult to write about in a way because we are not far away removed from that decade to see all of what was cheesy, weird or trendy. Some of what became popular 10 or 15 years ago is still popular today. But other trends–zig zag parts, anyone?–were short-lived enough to easily write about. So I’m gonna give this a go.

Ten years made a big difference in what was considered an attractive skin tone for Caucasian women. In the early 90s, pale skin was attractive. Even if foundation made your skin a little lighter, that was no big deal. By the early 2000s, tanning beds, self tanner and bronzer were mad popular. Bronzed beauties (that’s the magazine world’s term, not mine) like Jennifer Lopez and supermodel Gisele Bundchen were emulated. Self tanner and bronzer continued to get less orange-y and better formulated, which is a positive. But the rise of tanning beds/booths brought about “tanorexics,” or people addicted to the tan they got from those machines. In the areas of the country I lived in between 2000-2010, there were tanning salons in every section of each city. Melanoma occurrences increased significantly between 1990 and 2010, which I think could be partly due to fake tanning. Those who were lucky enough to not get skin cancer from regular fake tanning almost certainly have some skin damage today. I am kicking myself for tanning in high school and college. I didn’t do it regularly, but I’ve had five pre-cancerous moles removed in the last six years, and I think tanning booths/beds played some part in that.

Okay, off my soapbox. My point is that tanned skin became a desirable look in the early 2000s and is still part of the beauty world today. If it was out of fashion, there would be a much smaller self tanner market and spray tan techs would be struggling. I get it–I am one of those people who likes to (safely) look tan. I get a spray tan a couple times a year, and I’m a pretty regular Jergens Natural Glow user. I say it’s because I think tan skin looks better with my coloring–dark eyes, hair and eyebrows–but maybe I’m more influenced by the tan trend that I thought.

For women of color, ten years made a huge difference in what was available for foundation shades. More lines developed shades that would match all skintones. Some lines, like IMAN Cosmetics, were specifically created for darker skin. There are still some companies today that need to catch the hell up and add some darker colors to their lines, but the options have definitely improved and continue to grow.

Mineral makeup became big around 2005 due to the success of the bareMinerals line by Bare Escentuals. It seemed like for a while there, everyone was swirling, tapping and buffing. I always ask clients what they normally use for foundation and although I still hear “bareMinerals,” I hear it less than I did a few years ago. I think that’s because women are getting less afraid of liquid foundation, as there are so many great ones now on the market. (Some gals have also gone down the BB or CC cream routes.) In the last decade, we said goodbye to the days of only full coverage, all pink-undertoned shades available.

The trendy eyebrow of 2000 was a lot thinner than the trendy eyebrow of 2010. It was fuller than the early 90s brow, but not quite Cara Delevingne level. One of the big differences between the brows of ten years ago and today is the level of brow powder or pencil used. Filling in brows wasn’t a thing for the average woman in 2006, but as you may have noticed if you’ve ever been on Instagram, it’s almost standard now.

Whatchu know about the smokey eye? This trend became extremely popular in 2007 and stuck around for several years. It was hands down the biggest request I got when I started working as a professional makeup artist in 2008.  I still get the request, but now it’s more like “Can you make my eye makeup a little smokey?” A true smokey eye is shades of eye makeup done on a gradient. So the darkest color is closest to the lashline and the colors used get lighter as you move towards the crease. (On the lower lashline, it’s darker at the lashline with a lighter color or colors under that.) The smokey eye started in the 1920s, so this trend, like many others, is a recycle of something that’s already been done. The difference between 2007’s smokey eye and 1927’s smokey eye was that a) There were many more eyeshadow colors and textures to choose from in 2007 and b) Brows weren’t the thin, low, drawn-in brows of the Jazz Age, and brow style makes a huge difference in how a smokey eye looks.

Lashes started getting a lot of love (and sometimes, abuse) by the end of the early 2000s. False lashes have been around since the 1920s, but other than a resurgence in the mid 1960s had been mostly the domain of models and celebrities. I don’t know the exact statistics on this, but I feel confident that false lash sales have increased dramatically since 2010. Lash extensions are also very popular and using Latisse to increase lash growth had its moment. New mascaras that promise the world come out every day, and the creation of new, supposedly groundbreaking mascara wands–many of them garbage–started around 2006. The desire for long, full lashes became so strong that cosmetic companies were using false lashes in their mascara ads and got called out on it. That is true false advertising. (Ohhhh! Killed it.) Companies now have to put disclaimers on ads saying the model is wearing “lash inserts.” I think that happened because I bitched about it so much on Facebook and this blog…

Your lipgloss be poppin’? You know it was if you were under 35 between 2000-2010. The glossy lips trend gained traction in the late 90s and went strong up until the past few years. The trend now is matte lips, although I keep seeing runway trends of glossy lips trying to be a thing again. (It’s all cyclical, folks.) Nude lips were also very popular during the previous decade, especially when paired with a smokey eye.

Acrylic nails, particularly with a French manicure, were the go-to look for nails up to about halfway through the previous decade. By 2010, 63% of nail salons were offering the new popular nail polish option–gel manicures. This type of polish, if you can even call it that, was invented in the 1980s but due to some product flaws and limited education on the service, faded out for 20 years. From what I can tell–and this could just be the part of the country I live in–gel manicures are now considerably more popular than acrylic nails. In the almost 40 weddings I have personally done this year, I have seen acrylic nails exactly twice. Everyone else has had gel manicures, which tells me this 2010 trend is still going strong.

What was hair looking like in the last decade? Up through 2005, chunky highlights, zig zag hair parts and two-toned hair–think Cristina Aguilera during her “Dirty” era–were big. Flat iron mania hit around 2008. The flat iron itself had existed for over 100 years, but with its ceramic plates and adjustable heat settings, the flat irons of the later part of the last decade were far superior to their predecessors. And so, flat ironed hair became popular. Smooth, sleek and shiny was the goal, and a good flat iron and the right products could deliver.

Hair extensions had been used on models and actresses forever, but during this decade, that secret came out and they became mainstream. African American women had been getting weaves (sewn or braided-in extensions) for years, but the hair extensions I’m referring to were mostly clip-in, glued-in or taped-in extensions. Extensions are still popular today. Just ask the legions of guys who have put their hands through their girl’s hair and felt a clip, bead or tape.

While having a lot of hair on your head was a good thing during this decade, having hair elsewhere became undesirable to many. Chances are you never even heard of a Brazilian Wax–unless it’s some type of candle I don’t know about–before 2000. But starting around the beginning of this century, it became a common service offered by many salons and spa. Laser hair removal, which can be done on any body part, became popular. The majority of hair removal service clients are women, but some men have jumped on board too. Steve Carell’s chest waxing scene in The 40 Year Old Virgin comes to mind…

Injectables like Botox, Juviderm and Restylane became mainstream in the middle of the last decade. Chemical peels and lasers that reduce pigmentation also grew in popularity. More dermatologists and estheticians came out with their own skincare lines and regular facials became more commonplace. A greater emphasis was placed on clear, youthful skin during this decade, and that has only increased in recent years.

There are a lot of other areas related areas I could get into–YouTube beauty tutorials, the creation of Instagram and its influence on the beauty industry, the effect of HD filming, the start of the extreme retouching era, etc.–but I suspect you’ve had enough.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and any of the other Decades posts you may have read. I love learning about the trends and backstories of those trends from different decades. But when it comes to trends, I say don’t follow them because you feel you should. Choose products, looks and styles that best flatter and work with your features, skintone, coloring, hair type, etc. Looking and feeling your best will always be in style.

Have a beautiful day 🙂

 

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1960s Beauty

Because of the multitude of different looks, the 1960s is my favorite decade in terms of beauty. If you have any memory of high school history class, you know that the 1960s was an era of big changes. Civil rights, women’s rights, the sexual revolution, the start of America’s involvement in the Vietnam War–this was not a quiet decade. Political and social changes happened at a rapid pace, and the younger generation was heavily involved.

In terms of beauty and fashion, the sexual revolution and the re-emergence of the feminist movement strongly impacted the average woman. By the mid 60s, she no longer felt as constrained by the male’s definition of what she should look like. Hot pants and bikinis became popular, marking the first time women routinely showed that much skin in public. Many women felt they no longer needed to wear what their fathers or husbands deemed appropriate for them, so whether that meant miniskirts and go go boots or bell bottoms and paisley tunics, they didn’t all conform to a man’s standards.

The re-emergence of feminist movement effected women in two ways in regards to beauty. Some revolted and didn’t wear makeup at all, while others embraced makeup and wore it as a badge of honor, like many suffragettes had done some 50 years before.  In the 60s, it was finally up to women what they wanted to do. There were of course still trends, which many blindly followed, but it was unlike past decades because women did not feel they only had one or two options.

“The Single Girl,” a fashion photography look, was meant to represent movement. The Single Girl was young, single (duh), independent and active. She didn’t have to depend on a male for her financial or emotional needs. Empowering, right? Except for the part where she was also supposed to have an almost adolescent figure. Model Jean Shrimpton popularized this look.

In terms of hair and beauty, the early 60s looked like the late 50s, as is the way with the beginning of any decade. Just because the ball drops on New Year’s Eve doesn’t mean new hair, makeup and fashion trends immediately begin. So early 60s makeup brought in the black winged liner of the 50s, as well as the popular late 50s frosted eye shadows and coral lips. Hair, makeup and fashion were still very ladylike, inspired by women like Jackie Kennedy and Ann Margret. By the mid 60s, lips were often light, almost white beige. (They got darker at the end of the decade, with brown reds becoming popular.) There was a trend of pink lipstick on the bottom lip and red on top, but it didn’t become a huge look. Foundation was still used, but not as heavily as in the 50s. Blush was normally light pink or peach, but it wasn’t a standout part of most women’s looks.

The cut crease eyeshadow look was popularized by British model Twiggy, with her white shadow on the lid and dark shadow in the crease. Black eyeliner was used on top and bottom lashlines and was usually winged out on top. Mascara–often tube mascara but still sometimes block form–was loaded on top and bottom lashes, and sometimes bottom lashes were painted on with eyeliner. False lashes were extremely popular and used on both top and bottom. White eyeliner was often used on the bottom waterline to emphasize this doll-eye look. This cut crease, heavy-lashes eye makeup look was very popular in the mid 60s.

When it came to the all important eyebrow, some women threw out the brow pencil and went with a more natural look, while others did the opposite by shaving their eyebrows off and penciling them back in. From my research, it looks like more women (thankfully) chose the former. In the 1960s, you didn’t see much of the highly arched brows that were popular in the 50s.

French Actress Brigitte Bardot had a different take on 60s beauty. She did her own twist on a smokey eye with blacks and browns. Her skin was tan and not caked with foundation. Her cheeks were a light peach, and her lips were a pale matte color. She wore her hair long, wavy and teased. She was the sexpot of the 60s.

Another look that was en vogue for a lot of the younger population was the hippie look.  Hippies didn’t typically wear much (or any) traditional makeup, but often drew colorful flowers and peace signs on their faces. Their hair was usually long, straight and center-parted and maybe topped with a flower crown. The completely naturally hippie look, demonstrated by people like musician Janis Joplin, was a true no makeup-makeup and wash-and-go hair (with the washing part optional for some).

As far as the beauty industry, Max Factor, Revlon, CoverGirl, Coty, Maybelline and Yardley were the big players in the American market. Welsh clothing designer, Mary Quant, created a cosmetic line for her “miniskirt wearing customers.”Helena Rubenstein, Estee Lauder and Elizabeth Arden continued to rule the luxury cosmetics sector.

Polished, perfect hair reigned in the early 60s, but it was much bigger than it had been ten years before. Vidal Sassoon introduced the bob in 1963. Beehives (updo or half up style) and bouffants remained popular until the late 60s. Straight, center-parted hair (literally often ironed on an ironing board–ahem, Mom) became popular in the mid-late 60s. Wigs were popular, as were hair pieces to help pump up the volume. Many African American women started wearing their hair natural, and the Afro peaked late 60s through the early 70s. Head scarves were popular for much of the decade.

There was a drastic change in beauty and fashion from 1960 to 1969. The television series Mad Men did an excellent job of showing this transformation. The drastic changes in appearances coincided with the drastic changes in America at the time. There was upheaval  in many areas, and it was both an exciting and scary time for the country.

But I’m not historian (just a bit of a history geek, if you can’t tell), so I’ll stick to what I know. As a makeup artist, I love doing 1960s looks both on clients and on myself. Big hair, black eyeliner, lots of lashes, pale lips–I can’t get enough of that Priscilla Presley look. There is some element of 1960s beauty that will appeal to almost anyone. So take some Swinging 60s inspiration and apply it your look. It’ll be boss, man.

Have a beautiful day 🙂

*Double click on the images above to see them in greater detail*

Look Breakdown

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From what I can tell, here is what we have going on:

Foundation: Full coverage foundation or airbrush
Powder: Yup, all over. If it was liquid foundation and not airbrush, it may have been set with a powder foundation.
Highlighter: Yes, through center of face, under eyes, above top lip, on bridge of nose, and on tops of cheekbones. Kim is big on highlighting and contouring
Contour: Absolutely, under cheekbones, at hairline, and possibly under jawline
Cheek Color: Light pink, on apple of cheeks onto cheekbones
Eyebrows: Filled in with brow powder
Eye Makeup: I can’t completely see it because of the angle, but it looks like a light, frosted color on the lids and inner corners. Black gel or liquid liner at top lashline from tearduct to edge of eye, traced over and slightly smoked out with a gray shadow. Light brown contour in the crease, bone colored shadow on browbone. Gray and brown shadow mixed and applied softly at bottom lashline. I can see a definite black gel or liquid liner at bottom lashline near tearduct, but it either stopped there or was very well blended in at roots of bottom lashes. Nude/off white eyeliner on lower waterline.
Mascara: No doubt
False Lashes: Strip lashes on top, looks like individuals on bottom
Lipliner: Yes, a nude, pink brown, blended in
Lipcolor: A pale whitish pink gloss. Could be Kim’s favorite, Turkish Delight by NARS

Look Breakdown

Look Breakdown

From what I can tell, here is what we have going on:

Foundation: Medium coverage foundation
Powder: Most likely, on outer edges of face. Used minimally or not at all through center.
Highlighter: Yes, through center of face, under eyes, above top lip, and on tops of cheekbones
Contour: Light contour under cheekbones, at hairline, and possibly under jawline
Cheek Color: I really don’t see any!
Eyebrows: Filled in with brow powder and brushed up slightly
Eye Shadow: Shimmery light brown shadow on lids. Slightly darker matte brown shadow through crease. Dark matte brown shadow up upper lashline, lower lashline and outer V. Light shimmery color at inner corners.
Eyeliner: Dark brown or black pencil at upper lashline. Dark brown pencil (or maybe eyeshadow) dotted at lower lashline. Nude/off white eyeliner on lower waterline.
Mascara: Yup, top and bottom
False Lashes: Strip lashes on top
Lipliner: No
Lipcolor: Nude peachy pink matte lipstick
Lipgloss: No

My Mascara Ad Rant

Women of the world, please ignore all mascara ads that you see in magazines. Your lashes are not genetically inferior, or too straight and there is most likely nothing majorly wrong with the way you apply mascara. Those magazine ad lashes are fugazi, as Donnie Brasco would say. They are fake.

I have not seen a mascara ad in recent years where the model was not at least wearing a few flare lashes. (Although most of the time, they are wearing strip lashes.) Mascara does not make your lashes that thick, or long, or that even (no one has perfectly even lashes on both eyes). Now, I love false lashes and I use them on myself and many of my clients. But I would never lie about that. It just seems so wrong!

These mascara ads are such blatant false advertising that I almost can’t believe they’re allowed to be published. When I have my makeup line some day, I promise my mascara models will only have the real thing. Until then, I suggest buying your mascaras based on consumer reviews, not magazine ad “results.” Unless you want to start a crusade against blatant false advertising in the beauty industry. In which case, I’m in…

Rant over.

Have a beautiful day 🙂

Whaddya Mean, Tightlining?

No matter what industry you work in, there is technical talk.  Teachers speak of IEPs, real estate agents discuss easements, carpenters talk about risers and treads, etc.  Us makeup artists have our own language too…and it just happens to be the prettiest one 🙂

Sometimes I refer to things forgetting that I’m speaking in makeupese  and some people might not know what the hell I’m talking about.  So I’m going to do for you what Big L did for street slang–I’m gonna school you.

Airbrush Makeup: A liquefied form of makeup applied with an airbrush machine.  Can give skin a flawless look, depending on the product and application technique.  It sits on top of the skin, so it’s a great option for mature/wrinkled skin.

Brush Roll: The pouch used to hold makeup brushes.

Cat Eye: An eye makeup look that is thickest and angled at the outer corners.  Not for those who want a subtle look.

Color Wash: Using one shade of eyeshadow for both eyelid and crease.

Contour: Using a dark color to make something recede.  This is how to minimize the width or length of a feature.

Crease: The space above the eyelid and under the browbone.  This is where you put a darker color than your lid for a contoured look, or slightly lighter color than your lid for a smoky look.

Cupid’s Bow: The double curve in the center of the top lip. Highlighting the skin above it makes lips look slightly fuller.

Fallout: Usually used in reference to eyeshadow. It’s any shadow that falls under the eye or onto the face.  It’s the reason why makeup artists like me do the eyes first!

Flare Lashes: Also known as clusters, these false lashes come in groups of 6-8 lashes instead of strips that are the length of the lashline.  They come in different lengths and thicknesses and can be built up.

Highlight: Using a light color to draw attention to a feature or area of the face.  Commonly used on cheekbones, brownbones, inner corners of eyes and above Cupid’s Bow.

Illuminating: Products that say they are “illuminating” contain some kind of light reflecting particles.  Great for places you want to highlight.  Stay away from illuminating products if you have oily skin, because they can make the skin look more oily.

Kit: A makeup artist’s supply of products.

Matte: Products with absolutely no shimmer or shine.  Matte formulas can be drying, so avoid them if you have dry skin.

MUA: Stands for “Make Up Artist.”

Non-comedogenic: Means that the product will not clog pores.

Outer V: Used in reference to the section of the eye from the outer end of the crease to the outer end of the lashline.  Drawing a little “v” here (with the point going towards the hairline) works well with a lot of eye makeup looks.

Primer: A face or eye product put on prior to foundation or eye makeup to help the products stay on longer.  They also give a good base and help provide a smoother, more even surface for the products.

Tightlining: Lining the upper inside eyelid with an eyeliner.  This can help make top lashes look fuller.

Transfer: When a mascara or eyeliner smudges onto the eyelid, crease, or browbone before it has dried.

Sheer: Minimal coverage products that have a hint of color, so that you can still see through to the skin or lips.

Waterline: The inside lower eyelid.  Lining here with a dark color makes the look more dramatic and makes the eyes look smaller. An off-white liner here will open up the eyes.

Winged Liner: Eyeliner that extends past the end of the eye, usually on the upper lashline.

Hope I’ve decoded some of the mystery for you.  Please let me know if I’ve missed anything!

Have a beautiful day 🙂

Wedding Makeup Do’s & Don’ts

If you live in New England and would rather just hire a pro for the job, AB Beauty is here for you. Photo: Snap! Photography
Makeup: Allison Barbera

Congratulations! The love of your life has finally popped the question. (Took them long enough, huh?) You’ve got a lot of things to decide once you start your wedding planning process, and whether or not you want to hire a makeup artist is one of them. Of course, I recommend hiring a professional who understands colors, skin types, lighting, photography, etc., but I understand that’s not always in the budget. So here are some Dos and Don’ts to help you if you decide to go it alone.

Do practice a good skincare routine, especially during the six months before your wedding. Healthy, clear skin will photograph better and will mean you don’t need as much makeup.

Don’t get a facial or have any waxing done the week of your wedding. Even if you’re not prone to breakouts or reactions, this could be the one time it happens. Red, puffy or burned skin is tough to cover, so why chance it?

Do practice your wedding makeup look several times. I suggest writing down the products/colors you use. There’s a good chance you will be nervous on the big day, so a written list will help take some pressure off.

Don’t underestimate the time you need to do your makeup. If you’re rushed, you’re more likely to mess something up and get frustrated because you don’t have enough time to fix it.

Do use a foundation. Unless you have perfect skin, you need something to even out your skintone. A lightweight foundation like MAC Face and Body lets your skin show through while giving an even finish.

Don’t use products with SPF. There is a debate about this, but many products with SPF contain zinc oxide, which can give a white cast to the skin in photographs.

Do use primers on your eyes and your skin. Primers help keep the makeup on, so you won’t have to worry as much about face and eye touchups. For an eye primer, I prefer Too Faced Shadow Insurance. For the skin, I like Laura Mercier Foundation Primer.

Don’t even consider using a non-waterproof mascara. Even if you think the Father/Daughter dance or your Maid of Honor’s toast won’t affect you, you could surprise yourself. Mascara streaks cut right through makeup, so why risk it? I use this Revlon waterproof mascara on all of my wedding clients.

Do carry oil blotting papers with you. The camera picks up shine, but oil blotting papers will get rid of it. Powder will cut shine too, but it can get cakey if you touch up too often.

Don’t go on shimmer overload. Every bride wants to look glowing, but shimmery products can translate as shine in photographs. It’s okay to put a little bit on the cheekbones, but do so with a light touch.

Do consider fake lashes. I use these flare lashes (bunches of 6-8 lashes, aka individuals) from Ardell and even five flares makes a difference. They really open up the eyes and add something special to the look. Try them before the wedding day though, or have a bridesmaid put them on for you. They can be tricky.

Hope all of you brides out there found this post helpful.

Have a beautiful day 🙂

If Extra Bucks Were Real Dollars, I’d Be Rich

CVS, extra bucks, I love my extra bucks, drugstore makeup
I sure do!

I go to my local CVS so much that one of the cashiers knows my name, and he gives me Hershey’s Kisses and extra coupons when I come in. Last week, I made four trips there in 24 hours. I recently wore out my CVS card and they had to give me a new one. I think I spend more time there than I do in my own house.

Besides birthday cards, contacts solution and toothpaste, I buy a lot of my kit essentials there. Here are my top CVS items:

1) Wet Ones Wipes. I use these to remove fake blood from skin, and sometimes to clean my brushes in between clients. These wipes kill 99.99% of germs, so my brushes get properly sanitized, and they dry quickly. They’re also gentle enough to remove makeup from my human palettes (my hands and arms) without drying out my skin.

2) Essence of Beauty makeup brushes. Essence of Beauty is CVS’s cosmetic line. I adore their eye makeup brushes, especially the small pencil brushes. They’re great for placing shadow in the inner corner of the eye, and smudging liner at the lashline. The larger pencil brush is great for creasework.

3) Cotton Balls. If you remove your eye makeup–and if you wear it, you should be removing it at night–you need these.

4) L’Oreal Eye Makeup Remover. Every makeup artist has their favorite eye makeup remover, and this is mine. My eyes have been burned, stung, clouded up and otherwise assaulted by other eye makeup removers. But this blue, white-capped bottle has treated me kindly, and is able to remove even the most stubborn eye makeup. I use the original formula.

5) Ardell DuraLash Flares. I use these all the time. 95% of my brides wear them, so I buy a lot. Flare lashes are more subtle than strip lashes, and they allow you to build the level of drama you want. (Update: I now buy these in bulk from a beauty supply site but for non-makeup artists, CVS is the place to go for these).

6) Neutrogena Oil Free Moisture for Sensitive Skin. I find that undereye concealers work best when the area is prepped with a little bit of lotion first. So I use this non-irritating moisturizer on everyone. Also, it comes without SPF, which I prefer for weddings and photoshoots (SPF products can cause a white cast in pictures).

7) Hand Sanitzer. My job requires that I touch people’s faces, and it’s just not right to do that without sanitizing first. It’s one of those cheap but essential items every makeup artist absolutely needs. And of course, these aren’t for makeup artists only. Everyone needs a little sani in their purse, car, or desk drawer.

8) Petroleum Jelly: I’ve used this for chapped lips, to make eyeshadow glossy and to add a sheen to the skin. My cousin uses it on her lashes at night and swears it makes them softer. I haven’t tried that yet because if I add any more products to my nightly beauty routine, I’m going to have to start at 7:00pm.

CVS is quick, cheap, and (at least for me) convenient. What’s your favorite CVS product?

Have a beautiful day 🙂